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This video is about Codified Security Mobile App Security Testing Product Overview by E-SPIN in Malay version.

Codifed Keselamatan Aplikasi Telefon Pintar Ujian Keselamatan Ringkasan Produk

For those who can not join us for the session, please see the summary and highlight clip for the event.

E-SPIN recently run a Codified Security Mobile App Security Testing  what’s new session cover what new for new user and existing users.

For further information, please contact us or visit to our website on http://www.e-spincorp.com

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This video is about Codified Security Mobile App Security Testing Product Overview by E-SPIN

Codifed Security Mobile App Security Testing Product Overview

For those who can not join us for the session, please see the summary and highlight clip for the event.

 

 

E-SPIN recently run a Codified Security Mobile App Security Testing what’s new session cover what new for new user and existing users.

For further information, please contact us or visit to our website on http://www.e-spincorp.com

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mobileappsecuritytesting

75 percent of mobile app fail basic security tests

Through 2015, more than 75 percent of mobile applications will fail basic security tests, according to Gartner, Inc. Enterprise employees download from app stores and use mobile applications that can access enterprise assets or perform business functions, and these applications have little or no security assurances. These applications are exposed to attacks and violations of enterprise security policies.

Enterprises that embrace mobile computing and bring your own device (BYOD) strategies are vulnerable to security breaches unless they adopt methods and technologies for mobile application security testing and risk assurance. Most enterprises are inexperienced in mobile application security. Even when application security testing is undertaken, it is often done casually by developers who are mostly concerned with the functionality of applications, not their security.

Existing static application security testing (SAST) and dynamic application security testing (DAST) vendors solution will be inadequate unless willing to  modify and adjust these technologies to address mobile application cases and meet mobile application security testing challenges. Although SAST and DAST have been used for the past six to eight years and have become reasonably mature, mobile testing is a new space, even for these technologies. In addition to SAST and DAST, a new type of test, behavioral analysis, is emerging for mobile applications. The testing technology monitors a running application to detect malicious and/or risky behavior exhibited by an application in the background (e.g., when an audio player application plays music — at the same time, it also accesses a user’s contact list or geolocation, and initiates data transmission to some external IP address).

Testing the client layer — the code and graphical user interface (GUI) — of the mobile application that runs on the mobile device is not  enough. The server layer should be tested as well. Mobile clients communicate with servers to access an enterprise’s applications and databases. Failure to protect a server poses the risk of losing the data of hundreds of thousands of users from the enterprise’s databases. Code and user interfaces of these server-side applications should therefore be tested with SAST and DAST technologies.

Today, more than 90 percent of enterprises use third-party commercial applications for their mobile BYOD strategies, and this is where current major application security testing efforts should be applied. App stores are filled with applications that mostly prove their advertised usefulness. Nevertheless, enterprises and individuals should not use them without paying attention to their security. They should download and use only those applications that have successfully passed security tests conducted by specialized application security testing vendors.

By 2017, the focus of endpoint breaches will shift to tablets and smartphones. Enterprises should focus on data protection on mobile devices through usable and efficient solutions, such as application containment (via wrapping, software development kits or hardening).

Through 2017, 75 percent of mobile security breaches will be the result of mobile application misconfigurations, rather than the outcome of deeply technical attacks on mobile devices. A classic example of misconfiguration is the misuse of personal cloud service through apps residing on smartphones and tablets. When used to convey enterprise data, these apps lead to data leaks that the organization remains unaware for the vast majority.

E-SPIN End to End Mobile App Security Testing as a Service or Solution Package

E-SPIN’s Mobile App Security Testing service provides a detailed security analysis of your phone or tablet based app. A key feature of this service is commercial grade mobile application security testing tool will be used for systematic, automated and scalability approach to uncovers many more issues than human tests alone, in the large scale and continuous comparison required across the testing period.

Depend on the services or Solution Requirement scope, E-SPIN can be bundled with HTML5 Mobile Application Testing with your web application security testing as part of the bundled. The same is to cover the Server Operating System Vulnerability Assessment, Database Security Testing to provide comprehensive and end to end security testing. For customer with the Source Code intent to go thru Secure Code Review, can discuss about the scope and platform, E-SPIN can be deliver the entire solution as a Services, or solution package involved supply, training and active maintenance.

Cost & Duration

The duration of a test depends on the size and complexity of an app, but can start from 6 days (approx four days testing, two writing up).

To discuss your particular requirements, please contact us by email info(a)e-spincorp.com or phone our regional offices and partners.

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Cyber-Attack

Cyber security is the set of “measures taken to protect a computer or computer system against unauthorized access or attack. Therefore, it is highly critical for enterprises to have an in-depth cyber security strategy and plan in place in order to provide the maximum level of protection from cyber security risks at not just the network perimeter but also the application layer.

The first and oldest wave is nuisance hacking, in which there is little material impact to the company. A classic example is hackers defacing your company’s website. More serious and widespread is the second wave, which is hacking for financial gain.

As business has migrated to the digital world, criminals have, too. What has emerged is a sophisticated criminal ecosystem that has matured to the point that it functions much like any business—management structure, quality control, offshoring, and so on. This type of hacking now goes beyond blindly stealing customer credit card information or employee passwords. For example, hackers might target a company’s financial function in order to obtain its earnings report before it is publicly released. With such advance knowledge, they can profit by acquiring or dumping stock.

Protecting the business from cybercrime is one thing, but companies also must worry about a new type of risk—the advanced persistent threat. If you think the term sounds like it’s out of a spy movie, you’re not far off. This type of hacking is predominantly about stealing intellectual property and typically is associated with state-sponsored espionage. The motives go beyond financial gain. Experts may quibble about the specifics of this type of attack and whether it always has involved use of advanced techniques, but this is a serious and growing threat. It is not an understatement to say that what’s at risk is not only your intellectual property but possibly national security.

Protect business from cyber attacks

With so many risks, business leaders may be unsure of where to focus. In our experience, it is crucial to elevate the role of information security in the organization and emphasize the fact that it is not just a technology function. As a make-or-break business issue, it requires a leader who reports directly to a senior executive. The title of the person—chief security officer, chief information security officer, security director—isn’t what matters. Instead, it’s the ability of that individual to bring security issues to the C-suite and help the management team think and talk about how security affects every other business decision.

Effective security leaders consistently demonstrate the linkages between security and the company’s goals. They remind the rest of the management team that security is a strategic issue. In the survey, the Front-runner group emphasized this approach by citing client requirements as the driving force behind the company’s information security investments. The other respondents pointed to legal and regulatory requirements as the main justification for information security spending in their organizations.

An organization that embraces this mindset, for example, might engage the security leader and the sales leader, together, to consider how better information security can help close or speed sales. They might determine that having well-documented information security controls, processes, or certifications in place enables them to anticipate and address customer concerns immediately when or before the issue first is raised.

Some companies we work with find it effective to have security leaders embedded within each business unit. These individuals report to line-of-business heads and work directly with them to evaluate how security can support each group’s business goals.

Feel free to contact E-SPIN for any requirement related to CyberSecurity. E-SPIN have being worked with national cybersecurity authority, multinational corporation on the various CyberSecurity Center, Vulnerability Assessment Center, Security Operation Center, Vulnerability Assessment Lab setup, from supply, commissioning, maintenance, knowledge and technology transfer, main/sub contracting to managed services engagement.

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Web Application Security

How do you handle your web application testing, vulnerability scans, test data and related security assessment reports? I’ve found that this is something that doesn’t get a lot of attention in web application security circles but is still impactful to the business. It’s actually kind of ironic that those of us working in IT and security often forget about what’s at stake if web vulnerability information were to fall into the wrong hands. I should know – I used to take it too lightly and many others still do.

The thing is, everything from passwords to SQL injection requests to hard-coded encryption keys – practically anything imaginable related to web security flaws – is contained in the following files, screenshots and reports:

  • Web vulnerability scan files (the raw data such as .wvs files in Acunetix Web Vulnerability Scanner)
  • Web vulnerability scanner reports (i.e. PDF and HTML files)
  • Screenshots of exploits
  • Proxy log files
  • Username and password dictionaries
  • Final web application testing reports containing specific findings and methods of exploitation

The risk is increased when all of this information is scattered about on multiple systems – especially once it makes its way to unencrypted laptops and data backups, third-party email systems and under-protected mobile devices (and trust me, it will). Even hard copies of web application testing reports can create business risks. I see those being tossed around to third parties quite often like it’s no big deal at all.

In the end, you’re not going to have complete control of the information resulted from your web application testing. You’ll have to trust people to do the right things. Unfortunately, that’s where businesses often get themselves into trouble. Thus the cycle of information security and managing risks continues.

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PTMFOG0000001190

Advantages of using AcuSensor Technology

  • Ability to provide more information about the vulnerability, such as source code line number, stack trace, affected SQL query.
  • Allows you to locate and fix the vulnerability faster because of the ability to provide more information about the vulnerability, such as source code line number, stack trace, affected SQL query, etc.
  • Significantly reduces false positives when scanning a website because it understands the behavior of the web application better.
  • Can alert you of web application configuration problems which could result in a vulnerable application or expose sensitive information. E.g. If ‘custom errors’ are enabled in .NET, this could expose sensitive application details to a malicious user.
  • It can advise you how to better secure your web application and web server settings, e.g. if write access is enabled on the web server.
  • Detects many more SQL injection vulnerabilities. Previously SQL injection vulnerabilities could only be found if database errors were reported or via other common techniques.
  • Ability to detect SQL Injection vulnerabilities in all SQL statements, including in SQL INSERT statements. With a black box scanner such SQL injection vulnerabilities cannot be found.
  • Ability to know about all the files present and accessible through the web server. If an attacker will gain access to the website and create a backdoor file in the application directory, the file will be found and scanned when using the AcuSensor Technology and you will be alerted.
  • AcuSensor Technology is able to intercept all web application inputs and build a comprehensive list with all possible inputs in the website and test them.
  • No need to write URL rewrite rules when scanning web applications which use search engine friendly URL’s! Using the AcuSensor Technology the scanner is able to rewrite SEO URL’s on the fly.
  • Ability to test for arbitrary file creation and deletion vulnerabilities. E.g. Through a vulnerable script a malicious user can create a file in the web application directory and execute it to have privileged access, or delete sensitive web application files.
  • Ability to test for email injection. E.g. A malicious user may append additional information such as a list or recipients or additional information to the message body to a vulnerable web form, to spam a large number of recipients anonymously.
  • Ability to test for file upload forms vulnerabilities. E.g. A malicious user can bypass file upload form validation checks and upload a malicious file and execute it.
  • Unlike other vulnerabilities reported in typical scans, a vulnerability reported by the AcuSensor Technology contains much more detailed information. It can contain details such as source code line number, POST variable value, stack trace, affected SQL query etc. A vulnerability reported by the AcuSensor Technology, will be marked with ‘(AS)’ in the title.

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Ensure-your-Website-Security

Is the exploitation of web vulnerabilities worth the trouble? Does it create unnecessary risks that should be avoided? Why exploit flaws anyway? This is not a black and white circumstance. Every situation is unique. But here’s what I know. The exploitation of web security flaws such as Cross-Site Scripting, SQL injection and Cross-Site request forgery is arguably the most valuable part of my assessments. Web exploitation can provide actual data, screenshots and other evidence which are great for getting management, developer and user buy-in on the issues. Otherwise, you may simply be running scans and making dangerous assumptions about what can or cannot be taken advantage of.

In many situations, all it takes is exploiting one missing web server patch, one SQL injection flaw or cracking a set of web passwords to show that problems exist in the respective areas. You may not need to exploit every flaw on every system to demonstrate what’s weak and what can happen. For certain projects, exploiting every single flaw on every single page could take too long and cost too much.

You have to ask yourself what’s really needed? What’s the ultimate goal of your security assessment? Is it to find some basic issues running basic scans or is it to completely vet a website or application and show exactly what can happen when things go awry? There is a ton of value in web exploitation…if it meshes with the overall project goals.

Vulnerability “exploitation” seems like a bad word that’s going to leak data, crash servers and cause business continuity problems but it really doesn’t have to. I’ve found that exploitation of web flaws is actually less risky than running the actual scans themselves. Interestingly, I’ve never had a problem running web exploits but automated scans have certainly created issues. Then again, unless the specific requirements call for it, I only run exploits that are not designed to create denial of service conditions. Your situation may be different.

In the end, if a web exploit (or even a scan) knocks over an application or its associated server(s), that may be a good indicator that you need to look even deeper. In the interest of minimizing problems, some people will just pretend the server or application doesn’t exist and leave it be. Sure, the problems are minimized but the security flaws are still there! Two wrongs don’t make a right.

For some people – especially IT auditors or compliance managers – exploitation of web flaws may be new territory. That’s fine. I just encourage people to really think things through when scoping web security assessments projects. Know all the facts and the possible outcomes and then dig in as deeply as possible. That’s the only way you’re going to find the flaws that matter and get people on your side to do something about them.

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