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Archive for February, 2013

Questions :-

I try to playing around with What’sUp Gold What’sConfigured  Did any body know how to set . I already created folder but I can’t open.I need your advice kindly view the screen shot. Thanks in advance.

WhatsConfigred Device discovery file

WhatsConfigred Device discovery file

Answer:-

Looks like you are using the stand-alone version of WhatsConfigured. The discovery file gets created when you add devices into WhatsConfigured. From the screenshot, it appears that you have already added devices in. If you haven’t already, make sure that you save and this should prompt you to create the discovery file.

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WUG SNMP Monitoring Workplace

Common ask question:

Based on What’s Up Gold (WUG) product , it shows that the SNMP is down . May I ask that what is the reason that make the SNMP down? Is it due to the router configuration?
Answer:

This could be caused by a number of reasons. If you are sure that SNMP is configured properly on the target device, then make sure that the community string you have applied to the device is correct. That’s where I would start.

*** Also remember community strings are case sensitive.

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Cyber-Attack

Cyber security is the set of “measures taken to protect a computer or computer system against unauthorized access or attack. Therefore, it is highly critical for enterprises to have an in-depth cyber security strategy and plan in place in order to provide the maximum level of protection from cyber security risks at not just the network perimeter but also the application layer.

The first and oldest wave is nuisance hacking, in which there is little material impact to the company. A classic example is hackers defacing your company’s website. More serious and widespread is the second wave, which is hacking for financial gain.

As business has migrated to the digital world, criminals have, too. What has emerged is a sophisticated criminal ecosystem that has matured to the point that it functions much like any business—management structure, quality control, offshoring, and so on. This type of hacking now goes beyond blindly stealing customer credit card information or employee passwords. For example, hackers might target a company’s financial function in order to obtain its earnings report before it is publicly released. With such advance knowledge, they can profit by acquiring or dumping stock.

Protecting the business from cybercrime is one thing, but companies also must worry about a new type of risk—the advanced persistent threat. If you think the term sounds like it’s out of a spy movie, you’re not far off. This type of hacking is predominantly about stealing intellectual property and typically is associated with state-sponsored espionage. The motives go beyond financial gain. Experts may quibble about the specifics of this type of attack and whether it always has involved use of advanced techniques, but this is a serious and growing threat. It is not an understatement to say that what’s at risk is not only your intellectual property but possibly national security.

Protect business from cyber attacks

With so many risks, business leaders may be unsure of where to focus. In our experience, it is crucial to elevate the role of information security in the organization and emphasize the fact that it is not just a technology function. As a make-or-break business issue, it requires a leader who reports directly to a senior executive. The title of the person—chief security officer, chief information security officer, security director—isn’t what matters. Instead, it’s the ability of that individual to bring security issues to the C-suite and help the management team think and talk about how security affects every other business decision.

Effective security leaders consistently demonstrate the linkages between security and the company’s goals. They remind the rest of the management team that security is a strategic issue. In the survey, the Front-runner group emphasized this approach by citing client requirements as the driving force behind the company’s information security investments. The other respondents pointed to legal and regulatory requirements as the main justification for information security spending in their organizations.

An organization that embraces this mindset, for example, might engage the security leader and the sales leader, together, to consider how better information security can help close or speed sales. They might determine that having well-documented information security controls, processes, or certifications in place enables them to anticipate and address customer concerns immediately when or before the issue first is raised.

Some companies we work with find it effective to have security leaders embedded within each business unit. These individuals report to line-of-business heads and work directly with them to evaluate how security can support each group’s business goals.

Feel free to contact E-SPIN for any requirement related to CyberSecurity. E-SPIN have being worked with national cybersecurity authority, multinational corporation on the various CyberSecurity Center, Vulnerability Assessment Center, Security Operation Center, Vulnerability Assessment Lab setup, from supply, commissioning, maintenance, knowledge and technology transfer, main/sub contracting to managed services engagement.

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